tvParty Election Broadcasts

Labour Party Election Broadcasts from 1983

Note: the text is based on Dr Michael Pearce's transcripts of tapes held at the Election Broadcast Archive, University of Leeds.

18th May 1983

ACTRESS IMPERSONATING THATCHER:

We Tories believe in policies that will create real jobs. We have established the essential foundations for a sound economy.

KINNOCK:

You've heard a lot like that from the Tories and over the next few weeks you'll hear a lot more. And it'll all be equally false. The tragic truth is that the Conservative government of Mrs Thatcher has been destroying the foundation for a sound economy. Two million extra people have been thrown on the dole, one for every sixty seconds of Tory government. It's by far the biggest increase in unemployment in the industrial world. Our young people, the future of the country, form forty percent of the jobless total. Two out of three school leavers can't find work.

And even if you've got a job you're paying at least six pounds more in real terms in taxes than you did four years ago despite the Tory promises to cut those taxes. Total output is down twelve percent on 1979 despite the fact that we've had the bonus of North Sea oil. Imports are up by twelve percent. Investment is down by thirty-six percent. Do you think this is economic success? We're told Tory policy has led to a leaner, more efficient and productive industry. Thirty-four thousand firms have gone bust under the Tories; prices have risen by fifty-one percent; our factories' production is down by nineteen percent. Success! In Thatcher's Britain only the demolition men have got full employment.

And now you're being asked to vote for more of the same thing. The people round here don't want more of the same. Unemployment's bad enough in London and the south east, but in Coventry in Liverpool in South Wales in Glasgow in Northern Ireland it's totally unacceptable. Everybody, young and old, black and white, men and women has got the right to work. Jobs are absolutely linked with the economy, they go hand in hand. So to start putting the economy right the thing to do is to get Britain working again, and only Labour has worked out a programme for doing just that. It won't be easy and it won't be quick, but it can be done and for our country it must be done. Labour is committed to getting Britain working again, by investing in industry, investing in construction, investing in rebuilding.

KINNOCK IN STUDIO:

A new factory means new jobs long before it even opens. With new machinery the factory means real lasting jobs for engineers and steel-workers. People earn more, and now they can buy the goods they want and need. Shops flourish with the increased trade so still more factories have full order loads. Increased production leads to increased efficiency and so to increased competitiveness abroad - better chances for exports. Exports need the ships to carry them, so another cruelly hit industry starts to grow again. And the biggest benefit of all is social. Lessening the financial worries means a happier more secure family and the knowledge that the youngsters of Britain have a real chance for the future. The Tories are always negative. They say 'We can't afford it and this is no time for expansion'. Leading British economist, Professor Morris Peston, believes exactly the opposite.

MORRIS PESTON:

It is only fair to judge a government by its record. This Tory government must certainly be assessed by its economic performance which has been disastrous. Whether we look at output or manufacturing investment or employment they've all been going down, and they've been going down as a result of this government's policy actions, not as the result of any evil outside forces or as a result of bad luck, they've been the result of government policy. And then it follows, it stands to reason that what we require is the reversal of such policies and then we'll start to move forward again. And the essence of that reversal will be a rise in oublic expenditure to get industry going and also a cut in taxes which will also lead to a rise in private expenditure. The two together will provide a basis, as long as they're kept going, for sustainable advance which will at last get this country back to work again, and at last get it producing at maximum capacity.

KINNOCK:

An expansionary set of moves as a basis for the way forward: that's Labour's economic policy, and Labour's Chancellor of the Exchequer will be Peter Shore.

PETER SHORE:

If at the general election four years ago I had said to you that if you had elected a Conservative government Britain would have three and a half million people unemployed four years later I don't think you would have believed me. You'd've said that that was a a wild political er exaggeration. But of course that has been our experience. And it is er ironic indeed, that the very government that has created this appalling problem for Britain should now claim that governments can do nothing at all in order to reverse the trend. And that it was they're saying. They're saying that Britain is stuck with three and a half million unemployed and that there is nothing that government or anyone else can do about it. But I say that's a council of despair and I don't believe it, and on the contrary I believe that there's a great deal that government can do. Governments are not all powerful, we know that, but the impact of government on the economy, the impact of government on job-creation, is very great. And what I want to do, is to use the resource of government, the power of government, not to destroy jobs, but to create them.

And I believe we can do it. I believe we can do it if we set about bringing into use, all those idle resources of plant and machinery, of capital and of course of people who want to work, who want to contribute to our national life, and who want to help meet the enormous and varied needs of all our people. But in given the depth of our present slump it is government that has got to make the first move. It is government that has got to increase, not decrease, increase its expenditure - at least initially - in order to get the economy moving again. That it was I intend to do. Not a wild splurge, but a clear increase of something of the order of six percent expenditure in our first year and yes, some cut too in the great burden of taxation that we now have to face.

Of course Mrs Thatcher says 'where's the money coming from?' but the answer to that you know isn't difficult to find. We will need to borrow, we need to borrow I reckon about six billion pounds a year. More than twelve billion pounds a year have been leaving Britain to be invested by the managers of great institutions - your money and my money in pension funds and insurance companies - in the industries and in the economies of our competitors overseas. I want only about a half of that sum to really start the first major move to get Britain back to work. And in addition to that, I want to see the massive oil revenues from Britain turned to productive use, to refurbish and strengthen our industries throughout the land. We certainly need to. Now I believe the government can, as I say, change the whole prospect, providing they have the support of the people, of this country. We've got to change, there is an alternative, and we must seize it on election day.

KINNOCK:

The biggest single problem facing the economy is unemployment. An effective positive programme to create jobs will rebuild the economy and only one party has concentrated on creating such a programme. But a positive programme can't be put into effect without positive support. On June the ninth you have the opportunity to vote. Are you going to vote your children out of a future? Are you going to vote for another thirty-four thousand firms to close, or are you going to act positively and vote 'yes' for Labour?

MAN IN STREET:

Well, I feel that Labour at the moment are the only party that we have to put this country back where it should be.

WOMAN:

Well, since the Conservatives have been in power unemployment has risen you know so high. I've now graduated with a degree and I'm still unemployed, you know, on the long list.

SECOND MAN:

Erm I've always been Labour but I'm, you know, more than ever now by what's by what I've seen happening around me you know.

SECOND WOMAN:

I've got the qualifications and that but there's no jobs going. I can't get 'em, don't wanna know.

THIRD MAN:

Well I think we've had enough oppression in the country, you know with er capital this capitalist motivated government, and I think that we've just got to have an alternative.

THIRD WOMAN:

Well I hope that Labour's gonna do something about it.

KINNOCK: Think positive, act positive, vote Labour.


23rd May 1983

ACTRESS IMPERSONATING THATCHER:

Great international companies are demonstrating their faith in Britain's future by choosing this country, under a Conservative government, as the location for major expansion. This is the way to get thousands of extra jobs for Britain.

JOHN SMITH:

Every hour since the Tories came to power yet another firm has bitten the dust. That's right, every time Big Ben has gone bong one more firm has gone bust. That's a hundred and sixty-four firms a week, eight and a half thousand firms a year, thirty four thousand firms gone in the four years since Britain decided it would be better off with the Conservatives. And the worst thing is, the shut-downs are speeding up. Of those thirty-four thousand closures, twelve thousand were in 1982. Multiply that by five more years of Tory mismanagement and another sixty thousand firms will have disappeared, and God knows how many millions more jobs, how many millions more onto the breadline, how many millions more children without a future.

It's the biggest industrial collapse in sixty years. No other developed European nation has suffered so badly. And if the Tories hadn't had twenty billion pounds worth of oil wealth to bail them out, things would've been even worse. Just look what's happened since 1979. Industrial output down by a fifth, car output down by a quarter, textiles output down by a third, steel output down by a half. In fact in 1982 for the first time ever Britain imported more industrial goods than it exported. But the Tories claim that it's only inefficient, uncompetitive firms that are going under. They'll tell you that Britain can't compete till its lazy, overpaid workers become more productive.

MALE VOICE:

So, how productive have the Tories made the British worker? Even with three and a half million unemployed and the threat of more output per worker has risen only five per cent in the last four years. But in the previous four years output per worker rose fourteen per cent, because Labour and the unions worked together. So much for the Tory claim to be making Britain more efficient. But why have they failed to do so? Quite simply they've refused to invest Britain's vital savings and oil riches where they're most desperately needed: in Britain. Instead they've invested in the dole queue, spending seventeen thousand million pounds, yes seventeen thousand million pounds, on maintaining the worst level of unemployment since the 1930s. Since 1979 Tory investment abroad has been bleeding Britain to death. Total investment abroad has been a monstrous thirty-five thousand million pounds, and while the Tories have helped Britain's competitors grow stronger investment in Britain's industry is down by a third. By starving Britain of money the Tories are literally demolishing British industry brick by brick. Look what happens when they say no to new factories: brickworks go bust, and glassworks, timber mills, electrical suppliers, plumbing suppliers. Their workers lose jobs so they can't buy clothes, the clothing shops go bust and their workers, and clothing factories go bust and their workers.

JOHN SMITH:

There's only one way to stop this Tory demolition job. It's by voting Labour on June 9th. Labour rebuilt war-damaged Britain after 1945 and Tory-damaged Britain after 1973. The moment you bring Labour back we'll start an emergency programme of investment in Britain's investment starved industry, transport, housing, new technology. Here's just one example of how it works. Invest money in sorely needed new homes and brickworks earn money. And all the other construction industries, they all need to take on new workers. The workers stop getting dole money and start buying clothes for their children again. Clothing shops order more from the clothing factories. The clothing factories order more from the textile industry, and all along the line more workers come off the dole and start buying things again. And that's just one example of how by investing in Britain, Labour can get Britain working again. But the Tories will tell you this is all pie in the sky. They'll tell you no - Britain can't afford the billions of pounds it will cost. Under the Tories that's absolutely true.

MALE VOICE:

When the Tories say we can't afford it, what do they mean? Do they mean we haven't the resources to do it? Of course we have. There are three million and more of them standing in the dole queue. If they were back at work, they could increase total output by about thirty thousand million pounds a year. And with that amount we could treble the education budget, or we could increase the house-building programme more than ten-fold. Or we could nearly double investment in private industry. Or perhaps they mean we can't finance it. Why not borrow then? Because, as we're told so often, we mustn't spend more than we earn. But every house-owning family in the country borrowed to but its house. Every expanding firm borrows to finance its growth. And since 1979 we have lent our foreign competitors thirty-five thousand million pounds. If it's all right for them to borrow our money, why can't we borrow our own and invest it here in Britain?

JOHN SMITH:

For the past four years the Tories have been demolishing Britain's industry. Demolishing Britain's jobs. Demolishing the lives of British people everywhere. Now on June 9th they want you to vote for five more years of the same bitter medicine. Are you really going to vote your firm out of business? Are you going to vote yourself out of a job? Are you going to vote for retirement at sixteen? Or are you going to think positive, act positive, and vote 'yes' for Labour?

YOUNG MAN:

I think this government, I think it's just destroying everything it's de- destroying employment as much as anything else and not putting anything in its place.

OTHER MAN:

Mrs Thatcher has an economic answer but it's it's an economic answer that does a few people a lot of good but not the majority as a whole.

OTHER MAN:

I mean if North Sea's here oil is here it really ought to be good for the British people and not others.

OTHER MAN:

I believe and I'm going to vote Labour cos I believe the Labour party will increase expenditure and that will find its way through and that will therefore benefit industry.

ANOTHER MAN:

Well I think that er the er oil probably could've been er much better spent than it has been, er it should certainly should have been used as an investment into business and er er far more so than it has been.

ANOTHER MAN:

I believe that the only chance for the future of the British people, and particularly the eleven million poor and the unemployed and everyone else is that er, we have to have a socialist government

JOHN SMITH:

Think positive, act positive, vote Labour.

27th May 1983

VOICE OVER:

Homelessness, waste, desolation, destruction, vandalism and apathy. These are the consequences of bad social policies and like dominoes the knock-on effect of one bad one is unstoppable. This Tory government has seriously damaged the economy, and this has had a bad effect on everything else. First of all, there's unemployment. We don't apologise for reminding you again that two million more jobs have been lost under the Tories and thirty-four thousand firms have gone bust. Unemployment breeds poverty. By May 1982, six and a half million people were on supplementary benefit. People on the breadline can't afford the basic necessities of life. Prescription charges have gone up from twenty pence, to one pound forty - an increase of six hundred percent. Since 1979, electricity prices have gone up by eighty four percent, and gas by a hundred and fifteen percent. Telephones become luxuries, so two hundred and thirty-seven thousand lines were disconnected in 1982. And of course housing suffers. This Tory government has the worst housing record since the 1920s. Fewer houses were started in 1982 than in any year since 1925. Council rents have doubled. Mortgage payments have gone up by one quarter. There are more than one million homes that have been condemned as unfit for human habitation, with three and a half million people living in them. Two and a half million homes are seriously affected by damp, with all the health risks to those people living in them.

DENZIL DAVIES:

We are faced today in May 1983 with a dire housing crisis, especially in our inner cities. But just as the Labour government of 1945 got down to it and rebuilt our country, so will we when we win the election. We have a positive programme for action and our first priority will be to out people back to work. We will build the factories, we will build the schools, we will build the hospitals that people so desperately need. And our aim also will be to secure a decent home for everyone. So Labour will give local councils the means to build fifty percent more houses. We shall devote substantially increased resources for home improvements and every tenant, council and private, will be ebtitled to routine repairs at the landlord's expense. We shall get empty council houses back into use urgently and quickly. We shall boosts the funds available to the inner cities. This bold policy won't be easy and it won't be quick, but it can be done and it will be done.

ROY HATTERSLEY:

It must be done. The social pressures that unemployment, poor housing and poverty create are becoming a danger to us all. The tragedies which overcame Bristol, Brixton and Toxteth two years ago, could spread like wild-fire. The forces of law and order are under a strain which they cannot stand much longer. We need a positive and practical programme of crime prevention. Nothing can excuse the crime increase we've suffered, but there's no doubt that unemployment is one of its causes. As Willie Whitelaw said himself, 'if boys and girls do not obtain jobs they do not see any reason why they should take part in society and comply with its rules'. Since May 1979, serious crime has increased by thirty percent. Now a serious crime is committed every ten seconds. And more and more criminals are escaping capture and conviction. The detection rate has gone down ten percent since the Tories were elected, and all this is despite expenditure on the police increasing by two thirds. Our policies on law and order are preceise and practical. Peace and safety come from effective policing: police back amongst the people, on the beat and part of the community, well known, accepted and respected. So we'll operate a common-sense four point plan: police on foot, back on the streets; housing estates made more thief proof, with better lighting, an old people's warden service, and controlled entry into blocks of flats. Community police committees that give you a say on how your police behave. And better technical and support services for the police themselves. The victims of crime will be helped by a more generous scheme of compensation. And to keep the police a friendly part of the community we'll impose strict limits on searches, fingerprinting and the use of the power of arrest. Labour will create the social conditions which reduce crime. And we'll organise the police in a way which deters crime, and where crimes are committed, unlike today actually catches the criminals.

DENZIL DAVIES:

Labour's plan to reduce unemployment will need money. So will our housing programme and so will our reforms on law and order. And where will the money come from? It will come from ending the waste of the country's resources that Mrs Thatcher and her ministers are now encouraging. Seventeen billion pounds is wasted every year on the cost of unemployment. Twenty billion pounds, our income from North Sea oil, has been frittered away. And a further ten billion pounds is wasted abroad with little obvious benefit to Britain. Labour will use the country's resources to put money back into the economy and invest for expansion once again.

If you build a house, or repair a home, more building workers are needed. Other jobs are created which means more money in people's pockets, communities start to thrive again, so a youth centre is built, children and young people are kept off the streets, the streets become safer, and the local bobby is seen as part of the community, accepted by young and old alike. We have seen the consequences of unemployment, how it has a bad effect on the economy, on health, on housing and on law and order. Think about it. Mrs Thatcher has nothing to offer you at this election, except more of the same. Are you going to vote for retirement at sixteen? Are you going to vote for the death of the health service? Are you going to vote yourself out of a job? Or are you going to think positive, act positive, and say 'yes' to Labour?

MAN:

well I think we need more houses and the Tories are clearly not going to build more houses and er I can't see really why people should be unemployed and there're so many construction people (-) people in the construction industry unemployed when there's a such desperate housing shortage

WOMAN:

The housing did you say?

MAN:

Yeah

WOMAN:

Well we haven't built any have we?

SECOND MAN:

I blame it down to unemployment because of the the lads have got nothing else to to do but wander round the streets.

SECOND WOMAN:

My husband's unemployed. He's been unemployed for two years now , and he's only twenty-four. He can't get a job.

THIRD MAN:

I think they should be building er houses instead of spending money on er defence and all that.

FOURTH MAN:

I think the root of crime is is a s- social just unrest which is unemployment basically.

THIRD WOMAN:

I would never vote for Margaret Thatcher after what she's done to the country.

DENZIL DAVIES:

Think positive, act positive, vote Labour.

2nd June 1983

MICHAEL FOOT:

How are we going to save and protect our National Health Service? It is one of our country's most precious possessions. It comes to help people - sick people, old people, children who fall ill - at the very moment they need that help most: when they are afraid; when they certainly don't want the extra worry of how the bills are to be paid. That's why the Labour Party created the National Health Service - a free service across the whole country, free of any cash payment for the patient. Nothing like that ever existed before. That was the ideal of those who founded the service, a wonderful ideal indeed - a practical proof of how the people's needs can be placed first before anything else. But what Labour created has been under attack for four years - a most serious attack as we shall show. One of the big issues at stake in this election is to make sure that our National Health Service is truly kept a national service for all our people. Only the Labour party that created this service can do that.

FEMALE ACTOR (RP accent):

We have no intention of raising prescription charges.

JOAN LESTOR:

The Tories have raised prescription charges by seven times: twenty p per item to one pound forty. Hospitals have been closed and vital projects axed, while private medicine has been actively encouraged. Routine dental charges have gone up from five pounds to thirteen pound fifty - two and a half times. Charges for glasses have more than doubled - from six pounds fifteen p to fifteen pound fifty. Seven hundred and ninety-one beds are lying empty, and at the same time there are over one thousand doctors plus over eight thousand nurses out of a job. Charges up, standards down. A cry that can be repeated when we look at the Tory performance on education. Education spending has been cut by seven hundred and fifty-six million pounds in real terms. Five hundred and eighty-two state schools have been scheduled for closure. A quarter of all primary and a third of all secondary schools haven't enough books. A staggering twenty-nine thousand five hundred and seventy trained teachers are out of work. No wonder the school inspectors could report 'It is unlikely that existing standards, particularly in numeracy and literacy, will be maintained'. So our young people, the future of Britain, can't get a decent education under the Tories. When they leave school one in two will be out of work. What a terrible prospect.

Older people are no better served either. Now there's no link between pensions and earnings - another Tory move - all pensioners have lost out, and married couples' income is down by two pound twenty-five p a week, and a single pensioner by one pound forty-five.

And now you are being asked to vote for more of the same. 'We're on the right track' they say. Ask the three million unemployed if they think that this is true. Ask the people trying to run the National Health Service on a shoe string if it's true. And ask the jobless teachers and building workers if they believe we're on the right track.

Health-care is our right. Labour will increase expenditure by, for instance, building much needed health centres. Prescription charges will be phased out; so will dental charges. There'll be no more queue-jumping as we concentrate our efforts and money by investing in the National Health Service. We shall ensure that all National Health Service staff will be properly rewarded in terms of pay and hours.

Another example of falling standards is in education: the development of the next generation. Labour will make local authorities provide nursery education. Labour will make it possible for classes to be reduced. Essentials like books will be provided so children at primary schools get the best possible start. All children, of whatever background, will get an equal chance in going on to secondary school, and Labour will re-establish the school meals and milk services drastically reduced by the Tories. And we'll help parents by increasing child benefit by two pound. Reduction has been the Tory motto.

As with the young, so for the old. All important services like home helps and residential care are being axed. Our pensioners suffer terribly, as costs for essentials like heat and lighting go up and real income comes down. Labour will re-establish the pensions earning link and restore the two pound twenty-five p and one pound forty-five p lost there. In November 1983 Labour will increase pensions to fifty-eight pound for a married couple and thirty-six pound thirty for someone single. We shall make TV licenses available free to pensioners. We shall reduce heating bills for pensioners through fuel allowances. In short, pensioners must share fully in the country's future prosperity.

MALE:

My colleagues and I are very worried about our caring society in general and the National Health Service in particular. As each cut comes along we get more and more desperate. In my hospital we've had little replacement equipment for two years, and no money for a scanner which we need to improve our diagnosis of brain disease. But it's not only equipment we need. We need more nurses, more doctors and more hospitals. These we had under all previous Labour governments, and only a Labour government will do it again. The Tory proposals for increasing private medicine won't help the majority. It won't help the elderly, the chronic sick and the mentally handicapped. Indeed, anyone who really requires care. Only a Labour government will increase resources and allow us to return to a properly funded National Health Service. This must be part of a caring and compassionate society. We must put patients before profits.

DENNIS HEALEY:

The Conservatives are prejudiced against the welfare state. They are prejudiced in favour of private profit. But if they won they'd have to cut the health service like they'd have to cut pensions and housing and education in any case. Because they're expecting to spend thoudands of millions of pounds more as rising unemployment as their dole queues lengthen. It would be a false economy. Take the health service. Even now, Britain loses twelve times more working days through sickness than through strikes. So every penny spent on health means more people are producing wealth. And the figures show that a public health service is very much cheaper than private medicine. Look at America. Their private medicine is twice as expensive as our National Health Service, and they come far below us in the international league tables for health. In fact, a good public health service is good economic sense. So are good education and good housing. The Tories say we can't afford to care for people: Labour says we can't afford not to care - because caring is not only morally right, it's economically right as well. So are you going to say 'No' to health, 'No' to education, 'No' to the young and to the old? Or are you going to think positive, act positive and say 'Yes' to Labour?

MAN:

I believe in people not in profits - always have done. I believe that the Labour party will do more for people, it's a people's party.

WOMAN:

It just frightens me that if the Tories get into power again that these these sort of doctors and nurses that are the best in the country are going to be tempted towards private medicine.

MAN:

I'm going to vote Labour.

OTHER MAN:

Why?

MAN:

Well because er I'm a pensioner and they've er promised to do a lot for us such as er television licenses and er extra bonus for Christmas and er increase the pension.

YOUNGER MAN:

I mean I work in a college erm but the cuts have definitely made an impact particularly for adults. The opportunities have decreased a lot.

YOUNGER WOMAN:

I care about children not being able to get medical treatment much more because I think I can see my own child in that position.

DENNIS HEALEY:

Think positive, act positive, vote Labour.

7th June 1983

DENNIS HEALEY:

It's only three weeks since this election began. And already another fifteen thousand people have lost their jobs. Another man or woman, boy or girl, is joining the dole queue every two minutes of every day and every night. No-one is safe. And that's why we put jobs above everything else.

MICHAEL FOOT:

That's right. Getting our people back to work. Jobs, jobs, jobs and how to get them. That's the big question in this election. Just look around - engineers on the dole, building workers on the dole, teachers on the dole, skilled craftsmen on the dole, trained technicians on the dole, nurses on the dole, seamen on the dole, and more and more school-leavers on the dole. That's the terrible problem and it's still getting worse. That's the problem we've got to solve. And it affects so many of the other problems we have to tackle, like protecting our health service and our schools and getting decent houses and pensions. How to stop the rising flood of unemployment, which indeed is still rising every week as Dennis said. Of course, there is an alternative. That is the case Labour puts to the nation. We have the policies and the team to apply them. Policies which offer a real positive alternative to Tory waste, and experienced men and women who will know how to make them work. Peter Shore will tell you about our emergency programme, the one we will act upon on our first day in office.

PETER SHORE:

Yes, we will create by the end of our first year five hundred thousand new jobs - in building and construction, in transport and communications, in health, social and other services, in public and private industry. The money we need is available now - but is wasted. Seventeen billion pounds wasted on paying people who want to work not to work. Ten billion pounds of our savings flooding abroad to invest in the economies of our competitors. And North Sea oil draining away at the rate of eight billion pounds a year. We shall stop this waste and use our money to cut the burden of taxation and to increase public investment and expenditure here in [growth?] and we shall start it on day one.

JOHN SMITH:

The moment you bring Labour back we'll start an emergency programme of investment in Britain's investment-starved industry, transport, housing, new technology. Here's just one example of how it works. Invest money in sorely-needed new homes, and brickworks earn money. And all the other construction industries, they all need to take on new workers. The workers stop getting dole money and start buying clothes for their children again. Clothing shops order more from the clothing factories. The clothing factories order more from the textile industry, and all along the line more workers come off the dole and start buying things again. And that's just one example of how by investing in Britain Labour can get Britain working again.

ROY HATTERSLEY:

Our policies on law and order are precise and practical. Peace and safety come from effective policing. Police back amongst the people, on the beat and part of the community - well-known, respected and accepted. So we'll operate a common-sense four point plan. Police on foot, back on the streets. Housing estates made more thief-proof, with better lighting and controlled entry into blocks of flats. Community police committees that give you a say on how your police behave. Better technical and support services for the police themselves. Labour will create the social conditions which reduce crime. And we'll organise the police in a way which deters crime, and when crimes are committed, unlike today, actually catches the criminals.

ANN TAYLOR:

But at the present time, the cost of living and the level of unemployment has put more pressure on families than ever before, and three and a half million people now live in condemned houses. Yet fewer homes were started in 1982 than in any year since 1925, and money has not been spent to modernise and keep existing properties in good condition. Labour will fund a new repairs and improvement programme and reverse this trend. And in the last four years mortgage rates have reached record levels and council rates have more than doubled. We will freeze all rents for a year and increase investment in all sectors of housing. We'll give councils the means to build fifty per cent more houses and so start achieving our aim of a decent home for every family.

NEIL KINNOCK:

Our children and young people are our future. Labour believes that education and training is a vital investment for our country and so we'll provide nursery schooling for all children whose parents want it. We'll ensure smaller classes in primary schools to give all youngsters a flying start. We'll invest in technological, scientific and cultural education to equip secondary school children for the realities of the modern world. We'll establish a two year scheme of education and training - with pay - for all sixteen and seventeen year old learners. We'll restore the sixty-one thousand university and polytechnic places that the Tories have taken away from qualified young people. Now, in modern times, proper education is the raw material of our country's success. We can't afford to let it be neglected or wasted by the Tories.

ANN TAYLOR:

'Cannot afford' seems to have been the Tory answer to everything. The basic rights we should all enjoy have become a privilege under the Tories. We now know the Tories' plan to run down the health service - beds lie empty and hospitals have been closed while doctors and nurses are jobless and health charges go up. Labour would provide a health service true to its original aims: free at the point of use. A health-care building programme will be started: out go prescription charges, out go dental charges. Priority will be according to medical need, not to wealth. For pensioners, TV licenses will be free; their Christmas bonus will be doubled; and their awful heating bills would be reduced, by new special fuel allowances.

DENNIS HEALEY:

We can't make sure our people get the health and care they need unless we create jobs, real jobs. Getting people back to work again, getting people earning and spending again, that's what matters most. The key to that is investment. Investment in homes, in transport, and above all in industry - we must get those new technologies into Britain's plants - and investment in our people, caring for the young and the old, the sick, and the poor.

MICHAEL FOOT:

These are the things we've been talking about from one end of the country to the other during this election campaign. Our constructive plan for getting jobs, jobs to help the individuals denied the right to work, jobs to help the country as a whole to rebuild our industry and our social services. Our big aim from the start has been to end the sense of hopelessness and helplessness in the face of mass unemployment which Tory words and deeds have spread. I think we've made real progress here, showing people what can truly be done. More and more people can see the sense of spending more to sustain and protect our health service, to improve standards of education for all our children, to give a better deal to the pensioners who have helped to create the nation's wealth, to get jobs - real jobs and real training - for the great army of our young people now without a chance in life. Like everyone else they've only got one life to live and we must come to their rescue with all the speed we can muster. Compassion and common-sense, and imagination and fair-play for all our people. These are the good qualities of our country, which our Labour team has applied to our modern problems. Our team has translated those qualities into practical ideas for action, and that means a plan properly costed and one the nation can afford. Of course, we don't imagine it can be done by edicts from on high, by laws imposed from above. It can only be done by a party which calls for co-operation from the whole community, local authorities, industries great and small, public and private, the trade unions, to get those jobs for all our people we will need the backing of the whole nation and the Labour party is the only one in this election which makes that appeal. So come and help us, help us to get those jobs and to save our country. Think positive, act positive, vote Labour.

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Last Modified: 22 Oct 12
© Richard Kimber